walking

6 Great Benefits of Walking

There are plenty of reasons to be as active as possible – and according to UberWalker.com, there are many great benefits to be gained simply by walking.

As it turns out, walking for exercise will begin improving your health immediately. Why? Because walking…

(1) Puts less stress on your body.
When you run, you put 3 times your body weight into each step, compressing muscles and ligaments and stressing your joints. When you walk, you put only one and a half times your body weight into each step, meaning less stress on joints and muscles and less chance of injury.

(2) Boosts your immune system.
Walking eases stress, increases your circulation, and frees your mind for meditation and contemplation. All of these factors give your immune system a natural boost, which in turn helps your body fight diseases of all kinds.

(3) Increases your metabolism.
The more you walk as a part of your regular exercise, the more muscle mass you build up. When this happens, your body is transformed and your metabolism increases because muscles burn calories faster. You’ll crave unhealthy foods less often and sleep better at night.

(4) Helps prevent major health problems.
Published studies show that moderate walking for about 30 minutes per day lowers your risk of heart disease, type-2 diabetes, stroke, and cancer by as much as 40%. Walking also helps prevent osteoporosis, lowers blood pressure, and boosts energy.

(5) Improves your mood.
Besides all these physical health benefits, walking also exercises your mind. Any physical exercise increases endorphins, your body’s natural neurotransmitters that improve your sense of happiness and well-being. Walking also gives you a chance to think, listen to music or entertainment, and dream.

(6) Helps you lose weight.
For some, this is the most desired benefit. Walking helps reduce your cravings for food while burning calories. When combined with a balanced, sensible diet, walking to lose weight is a proven method to improve your overall health.

For People with Diabetes, Walking May Help Reduce Health Care Costs

If you could save $9.07 for each additional 100 steps you took, how far would YOU walk?

Participating in a walking program may indeed reduce out-of-pocket health care expenses for people with diabetes. That’s the recent finding by researchers from the University of Michigan Department of Family Medicine and the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Center for Clinical Management Research.

According to their findings, every additional 100 daily steps taken by participants was related to an average individual savings of $9.07.

The research team examined step count data for 7,594 Blue Cross Blue Care Network (BCN) enrollees who participated in its Walkingspree program in 2010. Using data submitted monthly by the subjects, the researchers were able to compare the change in total annual health care costs for the year before and after starting the program.

According to their findings, every additional 100 daily steps taken by participants was related to an average individual savings of $9.07. They also found that, on average, individuals without diabetes experienced greater total cost reductions compared to those with diabetes or diabetes with complications.

Among individuals who averaged at least 5,000 daily steps, the average expected total change in annual health care costs was $872.67 for people with diabetes and $2491.88 for people with diabetes with complications. Although there is an expected increase in health care costs for the average person with diabetes, this increase is relatively smaller for those who averaged more daily steps.

The group presented its findings at the Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting in San Diego this past March (“Can a Pedometer-Based Walking Program Lower Health Care Costs Among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes?”).

 

Photo Credit (top photo): Vladimir Kudinov http://www.vladimirkudinov.com/

Source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/03/prweb14166552.htm

“Closest Thing to a Wonder Drug”

According to Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this is "the closest thing we have to a wonder drug”.

He’s talking about (drum roll, please)… walking.

Yes, walking, that most basic physical activity. Thanks to social media, the very first steps taken by pretty much every young tot seem to be shared with the world. From that moment on, walking becomes (and continues to be) a critical, fundamental activity for a lifetime.  

That’s why walking is generally accepted to be foundational to good health. And according to the Harvard Medical School, there are five particular benefits to walking that you may find surprising:

1. Walking counteracts the effects of weight-promoting genes.
Harvard researchers looked at 32 obesity-promoting genes in over 12,000 people and discovered that, among the study participants who walked briskly for about an hour a day, the effects of those genes were cut in half.

2. Walking helps tame a sweet tooth.
A pair of studies from the University of Exeter found that a 15-minute walk can curb cravings for chocolate and even reduce the amount of chocolate you eat in stressful situations.

3. Walking reduces the risk of developing breast cancer.
An American Cancer Society study found that women who walked seven or more hours a week had a 14% lower risk of breast cancer than those who walked three hours or fewer per week. And walking provided this protection even for the women with breast cancer risk factors.

4. Walking eases joint pain.
Several studies have found that walking reduces arthritis-related pain, and that walking five to six miles a week can even prevent arthritis from forming in the first place. Walking protects the joints — especially the knees and hips, which are most susceptible to osteoarthritis — by lubricating them and strengthening the muscles that support them.

5. Walking boosts immune function.
A study of over 1,000 men and women found that those who walked at least 20 minutes a day, at least 5 days a week, had 43% fewer sick days than those who exercised once a week or less. And if they did get sick, it was for a shorter duration, and their symptoms were milder.

Our takeaway: get out and take those #CARROTsteps today!

 

Source: http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/5-surprising-benefits-of-walking

CARROT Sighting: Dr. Wisdom!

Henry Ford Health System launched its CARROT Health & Wellness Program for its 25,000+ employees with a special event that included a number of fitness-related activities. Attending one such event in Detroit was Kimberlydawn Wisdom M.D., M.S.  Dr. Wisdom is the Senior Vice President of Community Health & Equity and the Chief Wellness & Diversity Officer at Henry Ford Health System. She is also Michigan's First Surgeon General… and now, she’s a CARROT user. Welcome aboard, Dr. Wisdom!

Dr. Kimberlydawn Wisdom with CARROT CEO Michael Antaran

Dr. Kimberlydawn Wisdom with CARROT CEO Michael Antaran

The Henry Ford Health System staff prepares for their CARROT program launch!

The Henry Ford Health System staff prepares for their CARROT program launch!

HAP Uses CARROT for LPGA Walking Challenge

As a sponsor for this year’s LPGA Volvik Championship in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Health Alliance Plan (HAP) wanted to encourage spectators to spend just a little more time walking during their visit to Country Club – after all, living healthier lives is exactly what HAP is all about. 
 

So they staged a HAP Walking Challenge each day of the tournament, and they used CARROT as the primary tool to reward participants. To participate, contestants had to download the free CARROT PASS app and then connect with CARROT iBeacons positioned around the course. They earned points for walking within 200 feet of those beacons, then returned to HAP’s tent and redeemed those points for great prizes. 
 

Kudos to the staff at HAP for their innovative use of CARROT technology… and for motivating people to be more active!